On June 9, 1995, 6-year-old Morgan Nick was attending a little league baseball game in Alma with her family. Within minutes, someone abducted her and the case remains unsolved today.


When Morgan was abducted she was playing with her friends at a baseball game in Alma. Her friends noted that they saw Morgan speaking to a man in a red truck. She was last seen emptying sand from her shoes by her mother’s vehicle, and when her mother attempted to go see Morgan she was gone, and so was the red truck.


"It was never a thought in my head that Morgan would still be missing for 25 years," said Colleen Nick, Morgan’s mother. "Someone knows the truth."


"Even after many, many years, we know that missing children can be found," said Angeline Hartmann, director of Communications at National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. "We've seen it happen many times. In Morgan's case, the answers are out there. She is out there. It just takes one person to bring home a missing child."


At the time of her disappearance, Morgan, with blue eyes and blonde hair, was 4 feet tall and weighed 55 pounds in 1995. She wore a green Girl Scout shirt, blue denim shorts, and white tennis shoes.


The case made national news and was featured on such shows as "Unsolved Mysteries." Colleen Nick established the Morgan Nick Foundation in 1996 to provide a support network to parents and families of all missing children.


The case has left a huge mark on the state of Arkansas. The Arkansas Alert System for missing children was renamed to "Morgan Nick Amber Alert." This notification protocol acknowledges the Arkansas State Police as the lead agency to evaluate and prioritize actions.


"The weeks and months and years keep adding up," said Morgan’s mother in a blog post on the Center for Missing and Exploited Kids website. "Her siblings grew up. Her friends grew up. Her dad and I have gray in our hair. Her kitten, Emily, waited 19 years for Morgan to come home … she is buried in our flower bed wrapped in a T-shirt with Morgan’s picture on it."


A sketch of the possible abductor was released, and within the span of two days, two attempted abductions were reported in Alma and Fort Smith. On June 9, the same day as Morgan’s disappearance, a 4-year-old girl was almost kidnapped, but was saved after she screamed and her mother arrived. One day later, a 9-year-old was coerced by a man to enter a men’s restroom with her, but she resisted and was able to get away. Both of these cases featured a suspect that resembled Morgan’s kidnapper.


New sketches arose over the years of the suspect as the case grew colder. Various leads were to homes in Spiro in nearby Oklahoma and Booneville in Logan County as a possible spot where Morgan might be. In 2002, police conducted a dig on a private piece of land where Nick may have been buried.


The search was eventually called off after finding no evidence. In 2010, a home in Spiro was searched for possible DNA evidence that Nick had once been there. Police returned to the home in 2017 after receiving another tip, but again the search was called off.


After 25 years, Morgan has yet to be found. Her family is still fighting for closure on the disappearance. A new age progression photo has been released that simulates what Morgan would look like at her current age of 31.


Information regarding Morgan Nick can be sent to the Alma Police Department at (479) 632-3333, or the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-800-THE-LOST, that’s 1-800-843-5678.


A documentary film directed by Van Buren High School graduate and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Devon Parks is currently being produced about the Morgan Nick case. Produced by 5 Star Productions, NLA Productions and Mad Possum Pictures, "Still Missing Morgan" is being created as a multi-part documentary.


Since establishing the Morgan Nick Foundation in 1996, Colleen, her staff and supporters have worked to help find missing children and adults. Located at 1243 U.S. 71 North in Alma, the foundation’s office now includes 10 staff members, who receive tips and information "all of the time," Colleen said.