Now that Arkansas state Sen. Jake Files has pleaded guilty to bank fraud, money laundering and wire fraud and resigned from office, what's left to be decided is his sentence.

As of Wednesday, a court date for sentencing had not been set, said Charlie Robbins, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Western District of Arkansas.

How much prison time and/or other consequences Files will face is complicated, attorney Troy Gaston said, adding that he expects Files will be sentenced to some prison time for each charge.

Gaston previously represented First Western Bank of Booneville in a lawsuit against Files.

Because this is a federal case, Files will also likely serve a higher percentage of a sentence than if it were a state case, Gaston said.

In this instance, a point system of enhancers — factors that could add time to a sentence — and detractors — factors that could take time off a sentence — will affect Files, Gaston said. For example, an enhancer could be not only stealing money, but stealing public money, and a detractor could be pleading guilty before being indicted.

According to Files' plea agreement, maximum penalties for each charge include:

• Wire fraud: 20 years in prison; a $250,000 fine; both imprisonment and a fine; a term of supervised release of no more than three years after release from prison; a possibility of going back to prison if the defendant violates the conditions of supervised release; a special assessment of $100; restitution as ordered by the court.

• Money laundering: 10 years in prison; a $250,000 fine or the court may impose an alternate fine of no more than twice the amount of the criminally derived property involved in the transaction; both imprisonment and a fine; a term of supervised release of no more than three years after release from prison; a possibility of going back to prison if the defendant violates the conditions of supervised release; a special assessment of $100.

• Bank fraud: 30 years in prison; a $1 million fine; both imprisonment and a fine; a term of supervised release of no more than five years after release from prison; a possibility of going back to prison if the defendant violates the condition of supervised release; a special assessment of $100; restitution as ordered by the court.

The charges are in association with a $46,500 General Improvement Fund grant obtained by Files for use on the River Valley Sports Complex, which remains unfinished, at Fort Smith’s Chaffee Crossing. To secure the release of the GIF money, Files prepared and submitted three fraudulent bids to the Western Arkansas Economic Development District, the U.S. Attorney’s office stated. Files then instructed an associate to open a bank account under her name to conceal his role as the ultimate beneficiary of the GIF award.

When a first installment of about $26,900 was wire transferred from the city of Fort Smith to the associate’s bank account, the associate withdrew about $11,900 of the money in a cashier’s check made payable to FFH Construction, Files’s construction company, and the rest in cash. The associate then hand-delivered the check and the cash to Files who, in turn, deposited the check into his personal bank account.

Files also admitted to submitting a materially false loan application in November 2016 as part of a scheme to secure roughly $56,700 from First Western Bank.

Files is out on a $5,000 unsecured bond.