Continuing a tradition that has evolved since 1972, the Prescott Kiwanis Club hosted its 45th annual Kiwanis Honors banquet Monday, May 8 toasting 56 students for academic achievements and excellence before another packed house at the Prescott High School cafeteria.

Continuing a tradition that has evolved since 1972, the Prescott Kiwanis Club hosted its 45th annual Kiwanis Honors banquet Monday, May 8 toasting 56 students for academic achievements and excellence before another packed house at the Prescott High School cafeteria.
Longtime Kiwanis Club speaker, Glenn Vasser, said “Prescott High School’s athletes were honored all during the 1970s for their accomplishments on the field; the Kiwanis Club decided to do something for the academic achievements of the students.”
In a year that two Prescott teams in football and track won state championships — and all the honors that go with them — Vasser’s comments appeared just as timely in present day as they did 45 years ago.
Students ranging from sophomores and juniors to the now-graduated Class of 2017 seniors were all widely represented in the awards.
Many familiar Prescott seniors like Diana Aguirre, Kori Collier, Katie Tyree, Tatum Wilson, Andrew Purifoy, Kaelynn Karlovec, and Abigail Madden were among those honored, and later in the week, many of the same seniors were giving graduation speeches at Prescott High School’s graduation ceremony later the same week on Friday.
Members of the now-Class of 2018 had 16 students honored, but the largest contingent belonged to the now-Class of 2019, who had 22 students recognized.
Although the evening was mostly about the students, the keynote speaker was Chief Justice of the Arkansas Supreme Court Dan Kemp, who congratulated the students, and focused his speech on their motivations to continue their excellence.
“Three things you should focus on: motivation, limitation and creativity,” he said, as he used examples from his own life’s story to illustrate his points.
Kemp recalled story of automobile accident, which eventually got him into law school. He then discussed his first race for judge, saying “They told me it could never be done. That a small-town person like myself could never win, but I did. Accomplish more than possible, and don't be afraid to push yourself.”
Speaking of modern day innovators, Kemp noted that persons age 20-30 are making things happen in today’s world, mentioning the creation of Facebook and Instagram by young persons in their 20s.
“Who says the next big thing one day in the future can’t come from someone from Prescott, Arkansas?” Kemp said.